Conclusion Paragraph

The Conclusion Paragraph

            A conclusion paragraph’s main purpose is to close your argument effectively by reinforcing ideas you discussed throughout the paper.  In addition, conclusions give the writer the opportunity to close out their hook from the introduction paragraph; thus, giving your paper cohesiveness (everything fits well together).  Here are the 3 different parts, many of them you’ve heard before.

Thesis – is the main idea of the paper.  Didn’t you see this somewhere before?  Definitely, you should have been writing it in almost every paragraph.  But why here?  The thesis reinforces your idea and reminds the reader (by bashing it into their skull) what the thesis was.

Example: The United States just wouldn’t be the same without electricity.

This is my thesis, but hey, it doesn’t look the same as my thesis in the beginning!  Of course not, saying the same thing the same way is BORING.  Spice it up, find a different way to say the same thing!

Main Ideas – are your key supporting details.  Again, these were first introduced in your introduction paragraph; however, they need to be reiterated (repeated) but, just as the thesis before it, it needs to be stated in a different way.

Example: The United States just wouldn’t be the same without electricity. Businesses would shut down, less people could be educated, and some people may be stuck walking long distances to get places. 

These are the same main ideas from the introduction paragraph just stated differently.  Compare them:

1. the economy would suffer                          1. Businesses would shut down

2. education would diminish                          2. less people could be educated

3. transportation would take longer than ever.          3. some people may be stuck walking long

distances to get places.

Are my main ideas discussing the same exact issue?  What did I do to make my main ideas different?  In number one, I was more specific.  Instead of saying the economy in general I said business (which are part of the economy) would shut down.  In number two, I was more specific as well; rather than the broad idea that education would diminish, I was more specific in stating that less people could be educated.  In number three, I went as far as to give the reader a picture of transportation taking longer than ever.

The Hook– a storytelling, description or bold statement.  This call to action ends the paragraph off with bang because this is where you can be creative .  The object here is to go along with your original hook as best as possible.

Example: The United States just wouldn’t be the same without electricity. Businesses would shut down, less people could be educated, and some people may be stuck walking long distances to get places.  What about that rainy day?  With what would you fill your time? Dreams of an America with electricity?

or

Example: The United States just wouldn’t be the same without electricity. Businesses would shut down, less people could be educated, and some people may be stuck walking long distances to get places.  Even those accustomed to life without much electricity would be inconvenienced without the dishwasher, hair dryer or refrigerator!

The first example here is full of questions, but look at them closely.  How do they relate to the questions from the introduction paragraph?  Does it close the paragraph effectively/?

The second example is a bold statement.  The author makes a general statement that even those who never us electricity still depend on it somewhat.  This also brings the reader back to thinking about not having those conveniences, which will sway them to your side.

Summary

The Thesis – The overall topic/statement to be discussed stated in a different way

Main Ideas – The key ideas which help prove your thesis stated in a different way

The Hook – uses storytelling, description, and bold statements which calls the reader to action.  This closes out the hook from the beginning of the story.

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