Transitions

Transitions

            For years and years and years, teachers have chirped in students’ ears about transitions.  “You’ve gotta have’m in yer paper.”  But what are they?  And why do we need them?

Transitions are words or phrases which connect, contrast or align our ideas in an essay or in speech.  In middle school you were probably taught to begin each paragraph with one to “transition” from one paragraph no another.  However, (ß–see that’s a transition) there is more than one way and place to use transitions.  This sheet will explain a few places where they are necessary.

For the most part, you will be using these in your body paragraphs.  However, you may use them in the introduction and conclusion paragraphs.  Here are some common transitions:

Transitions:

Explanation

Thesis Explanation

Example

Explanation

To add information: As a result of something: To add an example: To go against (contrast):
In addition Consequently For example However
Furthermore Therefore For instance On the other hand
Additionally Thus To illustrate On the contrary
Moreover Hence   Nevertheless
Pursuing this further      
       

Example:

With transitions

Without electricity, transportation would take longer than ever. For example, Transportation Weekly states, “Without the necessary battery power, we would be driving horse and buggies again” (pg. 41). Driving a horse and buggy rather than a car would be much, much slower. Therefore, if one were to look at the United States today, not having electricity would make this country’s transportation slower and life, here, dramatically different.

Without transitions

Without electricity, transportation would take longer than ever. Transportation Weekly states, “Without the necessary battery power, we would be driving horse and buggies again” (pg. 41). Driving a horse and buggy rather than a car would be much, much slower. If one were to look at the United States today, not having electricity would make this country’s transportation slower and life, here, dramatically different.

1.)   What do the transitions do for the above paragraph?

2.)   If I wanted to add to my explanation, which transition might I use?

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